The 23-year-old had been sentenced in February to four and a half years in prison for complicity in the theft of a 100-kilogram gold coin from the Bode Museum in the German capital in March 2017. He had been released on parole and was due to begin. execution of the custodial sentence in September, but the responsible court did not issue that notification.

The man was arrested again on Tuesday, along with two other people, in connection with the robbery in Dresden in November 2019, in which two people fraudulently entered through a barred window in the Grünes Gewölbe Museum in Dresden, nicknamed the “Treasure Museum”. , they broke a shop window with the help of an ax and left with diamonds and other jewelry. The three suspects were brought to Dresden and charged with organized gang robbery and arson.

According to investigators, the men are members of a large family of Arab origin, which German police claim is known in the underworld in Berlin as the Remmo-Clan. Police in riot gear stormed a rally on Friday, removing hundreds of protesters by truck from Neukölln, Berlin. About 1,640 police officers were involved, according to authorities, the dpa notes.

Jewelry not found

The extensive German police operation on Tuesday did not lead to the discovery of invaluable jewelry stolen from the Dresden museum. “The stolen artifacts have not been found so far,” the Dresden prosecutor said in a statement.

The raids ended on Tuesday afternoon, after police searched 20 apartments, two garages, a cafe and several vehicles, confiscating storage devices, clothes and small quantities of drugs.

On November 25 last year, before dawn, two people fraudulently entered through a barred window into the opulent Grünes Gewölbe (Green Safe) in Dresden, nicknamed the “Treasure Museum,” smashed a shop window with an ax and gone with diamonds and other jewelry. The action lasted only a few minutes.

On November 25 last year, before dawn, two people fraudulently entered through a barred window into the opulent Grünes Gewölbe (Green Safe) in Dresden, nicknamed the “Treasure Museum,” smashed a shop window with an ax and gone with diamonds and other jewelry. The action lasted only a few minutes.

“We are shocked by the brutality of this theft,” museum director Marion Ackermann told a news conference at the time. She mentioned a damage of “inestimable” historical and cultural value, which cannot be counted in figures. “We can’t reduce them to a value because they’re not for sale,” Ackermann explained. Given their notoriety, jewelry is difficult to capitalize on the market, and museum officials do not rule out the possibility of thieves dismantling them to recycle them in a different form. “It would be awful,” said the museum’s director.

From 1723, Augustus II the Strong, former king of Poland and prince-prince of Saxony in the eighteenth century, deposited in this museum, built in the sixteenth century, his personal collection of jewelry and works of art. renaissance and baroque art.

The museum is famous for its jewelry collection, one of the most important in Europe, consisting of objects made of precious metals, porcelain, ivory or amber sculptures, bronze or beaten with gems.

After the renovation of the museum in 2004, the collections of old objects were stored on the ground floor, where the theft was committed, and the first floor hosts temporary exhibitions.

Investigators continue to look for stolen jewelry and possible evidence.