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The Republican judge chosen by Donald Trump has this week faced the confirmation hearings of the Senate Judiciary Committee

The accelerated confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court took place this week in the Judicial Committee of the United States Senate. On Wednesday, on the third day of confirmation hearings, Republican Senator John Kennedy sparked a controversial controversy when he asked the nominee who did her laundry at home. Barret, who is a mother of seven, laughed and replied: “We try more and more to hold our children responsible for doing their laundry, but this effort is not always successful.” Some journalists and critics reacted to the exchange, questioning whether a male Supreme Court candidate would have been asked the same question.

Barret is the judge nominated by President Donald Trump to replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died on September 18 and who during her years on the Supreme Court stood out for her work in the fight for gender equality. The 48-year-old jurist, who will be voted on for confirmation this week, is to give conservative judges a six-plus majority to three progressive members.

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