Jetpacks could replace ambulances in the future

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Great North Air Ambulance Service, a UK-based charity dedicated to providing helicopter emergency services, is testing a jetpack made by Gravity Industries to allow paramedics to fly to a mountain one day to provide first aid.

A jetpack could allow paramedics to climb the mountain in 90 seconds, rather than hiking for 30 minutes, according to GNAAS Director of Operations Andy Mawson. “With a jetpack, what could have taken up to an hour to reach the patient can only take a few minutes, and that could mean the difference between life and death,” he told BBC.

Gravity Industries, led by the founder and daredevil Richard Browning, has made some innovations in the last few years to complete several flights in an “Iron Man” suit and even set some speed records. He said the suits have two mini-motors on each arm and one on the back, allowing the paramedic to control his movement just by moving his hands. “The biggest advantage is its speed,” Mawson said.

Browning completed a demonstration exercise in the Lake District of the United Kingdom as part of the collaboration. “The demonstration exercise demonstrated the huge potential of using jet packs to save lives. If it works at normal parameters, the flying paramedic will be armed with a medical kit, with sedatives for those who suffered fractures and a defibrillator for those who could have suffered a heart attack, “Mawson told the BBC.

Lately, there has been an increasing emphasis on the development of jet packs. But some force their luck and make thoughtless gestures. Recently, an American Airlines pilot said that an individual carrying a jetpack flew past him while preparing to land at Los Angeles International Airport.

Two separate flight crews spotted the jetpack, as confirmed by the Federal Aviation Administration to the local Fox 11 news station. “I just saw the guy pass us in a jetpack,” the second pilot confirmed. flying a Jet Blue airliner. “Only in LA can something like this happen,” he said in astonishment.

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