Author: tv6news

Atherosclerosis, a buildup of plaque, can lead to heart disease, artery disease, and chronic kidney disease and is traditionally treated by inserting and inflating a balloon to expand the artery. Credit: Rohit Singh, University of Kansas Atherosclerosis, a buildup of plaque, can lead to heart disease, artery disease, and chronic kidney disease and is traditionally treated by inserting and inflating a balloon to expand the artery. Other treatments based on lasers can remove blockages rather than simply compressing them but are used infrequently, because they have a high risk of complication and low efficacy. Rohit Singh, of the University of…

Read More

Credit: CC0 Public Domain While the use of point-of-care ultrasonography (POCUS) in the primary care setting may lead to faster and more precise diagnoses and referrals, overscreening can lead to unintended harms to patients, including over- or under-diagnosis and overtreatment. A new study published in Annals of Family Medicine examined general practitioners'(GP) understanding of appropriate ultrasound use versus how early adopters actually use it in their practices. Researchers found that 24.5% of GPs interviewed for the study conducted POCUS for exploratory purposes in practice, rather than for focused examinations. Additionally, while all surveyed GPs indicated that they felt formalized POCUS…

Read More

Credit: CC0 Public Domain From flying a plane to swinging on a trapeze, there are plenty of high performance jobs where people must work closely together without making mistakes. Research into psychology and organizations has mostly concluded that the presence of positive emotions among team members generally improves performance across a range of occupations. But happiness and excitement may be overrated, at least where performance is concerned, suggests new research from the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management. Using pairs of cancer surgeons as their focus, researchers found that only tension and the lack of it had a significant…

Read More

Credit: Shutterstock The brain is made up of a complex series of networks—signals are constantly bouncing between those networks to allow us to experience the world and move through it effectively. Understanding how brain networks are organized is key to uncovering how they work. Scientists have learned that brain activity at rest—while sitting quietly—can provide approximate maps of the network organization. But maps generated with this approach miss critical details. An equivalent street map would help a pedestrian navigate from one neighborhood to the next but would offer little help for reaching a more specific destination. New research from the…

Read More

Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain New research published in the Annals of Family Medicine examined whether an enhanced 12-week post-discharge telehealth program would lead to reduced hospital readmission among patients who were hospitalized for a medical illness and tested positive for moderate to severe depressive symptoms while being cared for as in-patients. Among patients hospitalized for acute conditions, comorbid depressive symptoms jeopardize a safe transition from hospital to home. Participants were randomized to either a nationally disseminated readmission reduction program, the Re-Engineered Discharge (Project RED) program, or to an enhanced version of the same discharge program (RED-D). This expanded version of…

Read More

Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center. A 56-year-old man has pled guilty to sending death threats to state and federal health officials, including National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Director Anthony Fauci, MD, and former National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins, MD. Thomas Patrick Connally Jr used an anonymous email account and an email encryption service based in Switzerland to send threatening emails to the officials over a 6ix-month period, from December 2020 to July 2021, according to the Maryland US Attorney’s Office, which announced the plea agreement on…

Read More

INDIANAPOLIS — From the moment Daytheon Sturges, PhD, MPAS, PA-C, took the stage for his session at the American Academy of Physician Associates 2022 annual meeting, his hopes of transforming medicine became clear. Following the announcement that he had no official disclosures, Sturges made an unofficial disclosure of his own: “No medicines will be spoken about here, but I am trying to prescribe heart medicine because I want to change hearts today, if they have room to be changed.” What Sturges meant is that he wants to bring issues of justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion (JEDI, in his parlance), into…

Read More

Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center. Participants with long COVID, or postacute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC), in a small, prospective study showed no evidence of abnormal systemic immune activation or persistent viral infection, according to a report published today in Annals of Internal Medicine. The study included 189 people with laboratory-documented COVID-19 and a control group of people with no history of COVID or serologic evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Both groups were enrolled at the same time from the same geographic area. Participants with COVID were self-referred adults who were at…

Read More

The study covered in this summary was published on medRxiv.org as a preprint and has not yet been peer reviewed. Key Takeaways Meta-analysis data from eight randomized controlled trials (RCT) showed that transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) treatment for patients with disorders of consciousness (DoC) was more effective at improving behavioral performance compared to controls. Patients who underwent more than one session of tDCS showed statistically significant improvement in behavioral performance compared to controls. Subgroup analysis suggested that patients who are male or with a minimally conscious state (MCS) diagnosis were most likely to respond to tDCS treatment, and treatment effects…

Read More

Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center. Weekly COVID-19 cases in children passed 100,000 in the United States for the first time since late February as pediatric incidence rose for the 6th consecutive week, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children’s Hospital Association. New cases were up by 14.6% over the previous week to just over 107,000 reported during May 13-16, marking the sixth straight increase since April 1-7, when the count was almost 26,000. Over that period, weekly cases rose 313%, based on data in the latest weekly COVID…

Read More